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Specifications For Slabs, Pavement, and Polished Concrete

Michael Hoeft, K&M Concrete WOC360-IMG_1129-hoeft-770.jpg
The Somero Broom + Cure machine applies texture and curing agent minutes after concrete placement in a single pass.
Enjoy lunch at the World of Concrete in June and learn all about specifications for polished concrete, industrial slabs, and industrial pavements.

Concrete Polishing Luncheon & Forum: Specifications for Polished Concrete

Tues, June 8 • 11:30 am – 1:30 pm

Registration Fee: $105; $135 after 5/10/21

Hosted by the World of Concrete and the ASCC Concrete Polishing Council

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Sponsored by CureCrete, Skudo, and Superabrasive.

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ACI-ASCC Committee 310 recently released a new specification on polished concrete (ACI-ASCC 310.1-20). An expert panel of those involved with development of the new specification will explain the implications for polishing contractors. Topics include polisher certification, pre-construction conferences, mock-ups, testing, quality assurance acceptance, and more. The panel will discuss how the contractor can help guide the specifier towards the finished look their clients desire while managing expectations.

The panel will also discuss the contradictions that can arise within a polishing specification and how to handle those to everyone’s satisfaction. There are many things to look out for in specifications that are direct contradictions with other parts of the same specification or with industry standards, such as:

  • QC tests to use (DOI or gloss)
  • documents to reference
  • manufacturers permitted, required materials, approval of alternatives
  • specific polishing steps to follow
  • protection requirements
  • ways to work through the contradictions to satisfy all parties

Don’t miss the chance to learn how to steer your customers towards sensible and productive specifications.

Panelists are Clark Branum, Advanced Concrete Coatings and former chair of ACI-ASCC Committee 310; Bob Harris, Structural Services Inc.; Roy Bowman, Solid Surface Care; and Pat Harrison, Structural Services Inc

 

Quality in Concrete Slabs Luncheon & Forum: Specifications for Industrial Floors and Pavements: Opportunities and Threats

Wednesday, June 9 • 11:30 am – 1:30 pm

Registration Fee: $105; $135 after 5/10/21

Hosted by the World of Concrete and the American Society of Concrete Contractors

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Sponsored by CureCrete and Somero Enterprises.

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Two of today’s hottest markets in concrete construction are interior industrial floors and exterior industrial concrete pavements for parking lots and distribution centers. Learn what to look for in a contract/specification for these markets that might get you into trouble. This can include vapor retarders, moisture expectations, flatness/levelness expectations, site preparation requirements, retention payments, mix designs, use of ACI documents, pre-pour discussions, and designer expectations. Review specifications with an eye towards provisions to exclude from your bid, provisions that need extra money added to the bid, and provisions to discuss at the preconstruction conference. A panel of specifiers and contractors will discuss all of this and answer your questions. Panelists are Jim Klinger, ASCC; Chris Tull, CRT Concrete Consulting; Jon Hansen, National Ready Mixed Concrete Association; and a contractor.

 

To register for one or both luncheons, click here.

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